Day Seven Meditation
12 Min
Meditation
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William James Davies, DCMT
Mind Matters
Beginning day seven by looking more closely at posture, and why it is significant in sitting meditations. Also exploring how counting or noting the breath can help to keep the mind connected to the sensations of the breath. The recording contains plenty of guidance for beginners.  This is the seventh recording in a series intended for anyone who is new to mindfulness meditations, but also useful to people who might have struggled to engage with meditation practices in the past. Day by day you will become more familiar with different aspects of mindfulness meditations and exercises, and soon you’ll be comfortable to guide yourself in meditation, rather than just listening to recordings. Even though these meditations are presented as a sequence, you may like to repeat or return to some of the recordings, I would simply recommend that you don’t jump ahead, as you may miss some useful content. 
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4 reflections
C
Cherish
Observing...
In this day seven of the ten day series, William explains how our posture can affect our mood and how our mood can affect our posture. Then, he guides us to explore the space between our sensations, sounds and thoughts, just observing things as they are, without judgement. We do not become our sensations. We do not become sounds and nor do we become our thoughts. Sitting in a chair, I settled my body and my mind became aware, open and curious. Listening to William’s words on posture, I began to recognize some of my tendencies to slouch with my shoulders forward when I am not meditating in a chair and even sometimes when I walk. It is something I need to be more mindful of and correct when needed. William explains an analogy on thoughts during meditation. He says to observe our thoughts as kids playing in a playpen. In this manner, we are to be as parents watching our kids playing in a playpen, ever aware and observing from a slight distance with a gentle kindness. I found this analogy to be interesting because it can limit frustration if, and when, racing thoughts appear during meditation. Instead of frustration, recognize, observe and let go just like clouds in the sky. Observing everything within my sensory reach in my surroundings, I allowed myself to just be, as it is, in this moment. How incredibly peaceful! Thank you William! Namaste...❤️☮️🙏🏻😊
K
Kat
The mind as a child
Stepping back and noticing the mind playing with thoughts as a child really helps me reframe some things. My headaches and the painful needs of my body have lately seemed ridiculously childish to me. Hearing William reference that sentiment in this meditation made me smile and helped put me at peace.
K
Kat
The mind as a child
Stepping back and noticing the mind playing with thoughts as a child really helps me reframe some things. My headaches and the painful needs of my body have lately seemed ridiculously childish to me. Hearing William reference that sentiment in this meditation made me smile and helped put me at peace.
K
Kat
The mind as a child
Stepping back and noticing the mind playing with thoughts as a child really helps me reframe some things. My headaches and the painful needs of my body have lately seemed ridiculously childish to me. Hearing William reference that sentiment in this meditation made me smile and helped put me at peace.